158. Chocolate

With all of the expectations of social distancing and separation of family, facing the holidays, the medicinal qualities of chocolate are in high demand.

When the kids were five and six, I panicked.  It was written that people who are not exposed to a second language in the first part of their lives would be incapable of becoming bilingual.  I didn’t want Nyasha and Shante’s synapses to freeze.

A young woman in Lake Stevens was teaching Spanish to a small group of young ones.  (In Spanish), “Chocolate, chocolate, bate bate el chocolate.”  I hear that song.  It’s actually about stirring Mexican hot chocolate, rather than eating the firm candy equivalent, but it is still going round and round in my head.

Back in mid September, NPR played a report that claimed that Halloween candy sales were up 25 percent.  Personally, I don’t consider September a month to make such claims.  No one who buys candy in early fall plans to keep it around long term, certainly not until the end of October, and especially since many communities are skipping the open door adventure of Trick or Treating.

Candy sales are up.  One online claim is that there has been a 12 percent increase in chocolate sales in the last six months.  No surprise.  

We are living in a pandemic.  Few of us missed the Harry Potter series.  Madam Pomfrey had to stockpile chocolate in the hospital wing, “loads” to cure Harry and Ron alone. With all of the expectations of social distancing and separation of family, facing the holidays, the medicinal qualities of chocolate are in high demand.

Nyasha and I were laughing about the Halloween candy aisle.  When it comes down on November 1, there had better be a Christmas candy aisle at the ready.  (Wink. I think there already is.)