59. Urgent Care

Shout out for Kaiser Urgent Care in Bellevue. They have it all. Kind people. Quick response. Every testing machine a person could ever wish to be tested on. I don’t think I’d choose another location

Shout out for Kaiser Urgent Care in Bellevue.  They have it all. Kind people. Quick response. Every testing machine a person could ever wish to be tested on.  I don’t think I’d choose another location.  I am forever biased.

And here, Covid 19 pops into the equation yet again, because this is not your mother’s Buick kids, this is a whole new medical world.  Overall, it has worked to my current advantage.  Saturday, it meant that Kwami “left me at the curb”, a moment that would spread out and encompass nearly a week of moments.  

Emotional separation.  Unknowing.  Visual barriering.  Uncertainty.  

But I digress.  Next a CT scan, the obvious choice.  And the forever direct information:  “The colon has perforated.  We will take you to surgery.  Now.”

There is an odd twist in what happened there.  The cancer has its own thing going on, and perforation, or holes, could well have occurred because the chemo is working well, shrinking the masses, pulling the tissue apart.  

Also, surgery was originally not an option, because there was no chance of removing all of the radicals hiding in every corner, and no point to an uncertain or non existing recovery. 

Without an option, there were now options.  I talked to the surgeon.  The lower colon would go.  The colon mass would go.  I gave him the green light to remove whatever he wished, and to hold no guilt for bumping the pesky lymph system as it was an already active culprit in my demise, long done.  

Author: Michele Plumb Stowell

Michele Stowell was a teacher, a hand holder, and encouraging voice. Born an early Gen Xer, she has lived in Western Washington for the duration. Her children, two spectacular genetic daughters and an uncountable number of marvelous scout and school sons and daughters, shine as her biggest impact and her greatest blessing. Just before her 54th birthday, Michele was diagnosed with stage four cancer. Her writing and art work are expressions of the drama and the joy of living earth bound. On October 24, 2021, Michele was released from her physical body, transported to continue her work on other realms.

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